First, D-flat… and now G-flat… which note will be the next language?

Amanda Laucher has been talking about F#ing for quite awhile. Although that may look like something obscene, all she’s doing is talking about (and eating, sleeping, and breathing) a language called F#. The first time I heard about F# was at her presentation last spring at Central Ohio Day of .NET. I have since heard her give her F# talk at the GCPCUG VB.NET/C# SIG, and it is still quite interesting to hear, many months later.

Whether you’re new to F# or an advanced user, Amanda covers it all. So if you’re at a conference where Amanda is talking on F#, I’d check it out.

So today’s CodeMash Countdown language is F#.

Language: F#

Website: F# at Microsoft Research

A Little About F#

Okay, so maybe this isn’t a musical language.

Taken from the Microsoft Research site:


F# was developed as a pragmatically-oriented variant of ML that shares a core language with OCaml. Unlike other scripting languages it executes at or near the speed of C# and C++, making use of the performance that comes through strong typing. Unlike many type-inferred, statically-typed languages it also supports many dynamic language techniques, such as property discovery and reflection where needed. F# includes extensions for working across languages and for object-oriented programming, and it works seamlessly with other .NET programming languages and tools.

Where will this be seen at CodeMash?

F# is making its rounds at CodeMash at Dustin Campbell’s talk “Multi-threading Mojo with F#”.

Where can I learn more about F#?

Check out the Microsoft F# Developer Center on MSDN.

For all news F#, I’d recommend checking out Don Syme’s blog.

For those developers familiar with C#, check out What does this C# code look like in F#?.

Dustin’s blog also has many examples of F# in action. Matt Podwysocki also appears to have quite a few examples of F# in his blog.